Travel and Explore Passau in Bavaria, Germany

Let’s go travel again in beautiful Germany! This time we will visit Passau, the Dreiflüssestadt or the “City of Three Rivers” as it is famously called in English. The three rivers you can find here are the Danube, Inn and Ilz. The first picture I got here is the Residenzplatz (Residence Square) with the fountain in the middle which is called Wittelsbacher. You can also the Gothic east choir of the St. Stephen’s Cathedral which is famous for its Church organ.

The second image is the shopping street in Passau. Feel free to browse my categories here to see more pictures and information about this city.

Wittelsbacher Fountain in the Residenzplatz (Residence Square)..taken during our visit last November 2009.
shopping at the pedestrian precinct

History of Passau

Passau was an ancient Roman colony of ancient Noricum called Batavis, Latin for “for the Batavi.” The Batavi were an ancient Germanic tribe often mentioned by classical authors, and they were regularly associated with the Suebian marauders, the Heruli.

During the second half of the 5th century, St. Severinus established a monastery here. In 739, an Irish monk called Boniface founded the diocese of Passau and this was the largest diocese of the Holy Roman Empire for many years.

In the Treaty of Passau (1552), Archduke Ferdinand I, representing Emperor Charles V, secured the agreement of the Protestant princes to submit the religious question to a diet. This led to the Peace of Augsburg in 1555.

During the Renaissance and early modern period, Passau was one of the most prolific centres of sword and bladed weapon manufacture in Germany (after Solingen). Passau smiths stamped their blades with the Passau wolf, usually a rather simplified rendering of the wolf on the city’s coat-of-arms. Superstitious warriors believed that the Passau wolf conferred invulnerability on the blade’s bearer, and thus Passau swords acquired a great premium. As a result, the whole practice of placing magical charms on swords to protect the wearers came to be known for a time as “Passau art.” (See Eduard Wagner, Cut and Thrust Weapons, 1969). Other cities’ smiths, including those of Solingen, recognized the marketing value of the Passau wolf and adopted it for themselves. By the 17th century, Solingen was producing more wolf-stamped blades than Passau was. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passau

 
 

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